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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to c
. board of education. the issue the u.s. supreme court agreed to take on that will make history. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. now some lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> and a toddler taken from the only parents she ever knew because of a little known federal law. now they're fighting to get her back, and may be on their way to the supreme court. i'll talk with them live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your day with us. it was supposed to be just for laughs. humor. the listeners with a lighthearted prank. two radio deejays called the london hospital where the duchess of cambridge was being treated and tricked a nurse to get details about her condition. two days later, that nurse, 46-year-old jacintha saldanha, took h
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to say is you have to learn to pay that and that's exactly what the reagan administration did when they found themselves with somebody they can do business with. it could and ronald reagan may have been the only guy in the administration that believed in the near option that by god u.n. after. and here i ha
>> wanna and v tonight. a huge break through for u.s. natural gas. a key government study could open the door for eorts and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing the way though is present obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to nix them. guess who is behind it? my favorite chicago alderman. i say stop the madness. but alderman joe moreno is here to disagree with me. even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first let's take a look at today's market headlines. mediocrity apparently the reason to buy on wall street today. the november jobs report came in above expectations but the 146,000 jobs added is below average monthly growth for the past two years. that and 350,000 americans left the workforce. it all someh
to a four year low as u.s. businesses add 146,000 jobs in november. we look behind the numbers. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we meet the c.e.o.'s of three small businesses hiring right now. what they do and why they're looking for help. >> susie: and house speaker boehner accuses president obama of wasting another week in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the job market is proving to be surprisingly resilient. american employers hired 146,000 workers in november, much more than expected. and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7%, the lowest level since december of 2008. as erika miller reports, that wasn't the only surprise in today's report. >> reporter: almost no one on wall street saw this good news coming. there was every reason to think hiring would be weak last month. after all, many parts of the east coast are still recovering from devastation caused by superstorm sandy. >> i think the most likely explanation here is sandy's impact was significant but was so short-lived that it didn't extend to the sample period of the employment report whi
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
do. >> depositions rising in syria as the u.s. confirms its stance on political transition there. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insirsing that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented. sunni any allawi, christians, kurds, druce, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future and a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. >> is just who is president bashar assad and how big of a threat is he to the world? here to weigh in senior fellow defense studdies lt. colonel tony shaffer. set up for the audience who is bashar assad? >> bashar assad is the former president of the syria took over in 1971. and ruled frank whether i an iron fist assad took over in. there was hope that there would be reforms and much like other dictators who come in. it's double down and continue the same policies and trends as his former -- the person he replaced. we saw this in north korea and we are seeing it again. >> talk about the latest news. there are reports that assad has weapons
is going up to space and how the economy's going and the fact that people want to be here in the u.s. we've also found growth through process and our process takes what i call collaborative work forces methodology in a training program that allows them to accomplish great things. >> tell me just a little bit about this process. >> we hire typically high school graduates. and we bring them in and we assess their skills and their training and what they have to offer. we put them through a training program to train them towards a task or particular set of tasks. >> 100 nerves in 100 days. where did you get to the point where you were on this nerd drive. how did you get here and how is the drive going. >> we started in november with 100 nerds and 100 day modeled after a pbs member drive. and the deal is that if you were known to us and you get an interview we send you a hundred bucks. if we end up hiring the person we send you another 400 bucks and we're trying to get to a hundred nerds in as many days. i think right now we've had about 900 applications submitted and we've hired 189 people.
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)